<note> contains a note or annotation. [3.8.1 Notes and Simple Annotation 2.2.6 The Notes Statement Notes and Statement of Language Notes within Entries]
Modulecore — Elements Available in All TEI Documents
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.analytic (@ana)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) att.placement (@place) att.pointing (@targetLang, @target, @evaluate) att.source (@source) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
anchoredindicates whether the copy text shows the exact place of reference for the note.
Status Optional

<rng:ref name="data.truthValue"/>
Default true

In modern texts, notes are usually anchored by means of explicit footnote or endnote symbols. An explicit indication of the phrase or line annotated may however be used instead (e.g. ‘page 218, lines 3–4’). The anchored attribute indicates whether any explicit location is given, whether by symbol or by prose cross-reference. The value true indicates that such an explicit location is indicated in the copy text; the value false indicates that the copy text does not indicate a specific place of attachment for the note. If the specific symbols used in the copy text at the location the note is anchored are to be recorded, use the n attribute.

targetEndpoints to the end of the span to which the note is attached, if the note is not embedded in the text at that point.
Status Optional
Datatype 1–∞ occurrences of 

<rng:ref name="data.pointer"/>
separated by whitespace

This attribute is retained for backwards compatibility; it may be removed at a subsequent release of the Guidelines. The recommended way of pointing to a span of elements is by means of the range function of XPointer, as further described in range().

Member of
Contained by
analysis: cl m phr s span w
figures: cell figure table
gaiji: char glyph
linking: ab seg
nets: graph
spoken: u writing
tagdocs: eg valDesc
textcrit: app lem rdg wit witDetail
May contain
dictionaries: lang oRef oVar pRef pVar
gaiji: g
header: biblFull idno
iso-fs: fLib fs fvLib
textstructure: floatingText
verse: caesura rhyme

<rng:element name="note">
 <rng:ref name="att.global.attributes"/>
 <rng:ref name="att.global.rendition.attributes"/>
 <rng:ref name="att.global.linking.attributes"/>
 <rng:ref name="att.global.analytic.attributes"/>
 <rng:ref name="att.global.facs.attributes"/>
 <rng:ref name="att.global.change.attributes"/>
 <rng:ref name="att.global.responsibility.attributes"/>
 <rng:ref name="att.placement.attributes"/>
 <rng:ref name="att.pointing.attributes"/>
 <rng:ref name="att.source.attributes"/>
 <rng:ref name="att.typed.attributes"/>
  <rng:attribute name="anchored"

   <rng:ref name="data.truthValue"/>
  <rng:attribute name="targetEnd">
     <rng:ref name="data.pointer"/>
 <rng:ref name="macro.specialPara"/>
element note
   attribute anchored { data.truthValue }?,
   attribute targetEnd { list { data.pointer+ } }?,
In the following example, the translator has supplied a footnote containing an explanation of the term translated as "painterly":
And yet it is not only
in the great line of Italian renaissance art, but even in the
painterly <note place="bottomtype="gloss"

 <term xml:lang="de">Malerisch</term>. This word has, in the German, two
distinct meanings, one objective, a quality residing in the object,
the other subjective, a mode of apprehension and creation. To avoid
confusion, they have been distinguished in English as
<mentioned>picturesque</mentioned> and
<mentioned>painterly</mentioned> respectively.
</note> style of the
Dutch genre painters of the seventeenth century that drapery has this
psychological significance.

For this example to be valid, the code MDMH must be defined elsewhere, for example by means of a responsibility statement in the associated TEI header:

<respStmt xml:id="MDMH">
 <resp>translation from German to English</resp>
 <name>Hottinger, Marie Donald Mackie</name>

The global n attribute may be used to supply the symbol or number used to mark the note's point of attachment in the source text, as in the following example:

Mevorakh b. Saadya's mother, the matriarch of the
family during the second half of the eleventh century, <note n="126anchored="true"> The
alleged mention of Judah Nagid's mother in a letter from 1071 is, in fact, a reference to
Judah's children; cf. above, nn. 111 and 54. </note> is well known from Geniza documents
published by Jacob Mann.

However, if notes are numbered in sequence and their numbering can be reconstructed automatically by processing software, it may well be considered unnecessary to record the note numbers.